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This week, we celebrated fellow Instagrammers with under 1000 followers again. I love when we have theme weeks like this, because I get to discover so many new photographers. There are so many fabulous photographers out there who are new to IG or who just haven’t built up much of a following yet, but who have some gorgeous images filling up their feeds. Below are some of my favorite images and tips from the week and they are filled with great advice to learn from! Take a few minutes to read these awesome tips and then hop on over to IG to check out more from these talented ladies!

– Kelley K (@kelleykphoto)

 

@dianajexphotography

@dianajexphotography

Diana wrote: I photographed this little guy when he was 4 weeks old. I’m photographing this little guy every month to document his first year, so this was his one month session! I photographed this using natural light, my Nikon D700 and 50mm lens, 1/125 sec @ f 2.8, ISO 1250. This was taken on my travel bean bag with jersey knit fabric. Hmmm, newborn tips….a lot of patience! This was an in home session, so I photographed by a window in their bedroom. I just diffused the light by hanging a white bed sheet in front of the window.

A white sheet over a window makes for beautiful light for this photo. This is a great tips for softening the light in your home or a client’s home. 

@olgafedorova.photo!

@olgafedorova.photo

Olga wrote:  I used 35mm art lense, f/4.5 and exposure 1/15sec. The main thing in such motion shoots is to trace the object and move camera simultaneously. That’s all😉

Panning can be a tricky technique, but Olga did it wonderfully here and it’s a great tip for anyone to try at home!

@clairesearlephotos

@clairesearlephotos

Claire wrote: I took this spur of the moment in my loungeroom. My camera was up on the back of my couch balancing on a pillow 😂 I used my Canon 6d with my tamron 24-70m lense. Settings were f 2.8 250 shutter speed and iso 100. I then edited it in LR. I used my brush to black out most of the background to really highlight me and baby 😊

I love that Claire took this on a whim and just balanced her camera on the couch. Just proves that you don’t have to plan photos like this well in advance, and you don’t need a fancy tripod either.

@andel_petra

@andel_petra

Petra wrote: I took this picture at my friend’s wedding. I was the guest but I had the camera with me. The girl started crying that morning and run into her mother’s arm, then looked at me😊 It was bright morning so the setting was ISO 250, f 2,8, 1/250s, lens 50mm f 1,5, Nikon d800. In postproduction I used the color filter, increase the shadows, decreased whites, and highlights. At last I sharpened the eyes😊

The strong emotions and the strong eye contact with the camera are the perfect combination here to really draw in a viewer. You don’t always need eye contact but it can make an image more powerful sometimes.

@cedlywright

@cedlywright

Christine wrote:  I feel humbled to be solicited for tips in documentary photography, but here goes. Whether I’m photographing my own children, a family or a birth, I choose my camera settings and then just observe. Those “decisive moments,” as coined by Henri Cartier-Bresson, are absolutely recognizable and that’s when I press the shutter. I try not to interact with my subject (especially for birth – I don’t want that mama knowing I’m in the room!) because that’s when people show their true colors and art is made.

Another great example of strong emotion and capturing just the right moment. Christine has great advice about being a patient observer in these circumstances.

@kimberlifredericksphotography

@kimberlifredericksphotography

Kimberli wrote: I’m pretty sure I used my Tamron 28-75 which is NEVER on my camera anymore, but I figured it was my best bet to keep a safe distance. 😉 I originally took the image intending it to be color because all of the tubes were blue, but I loved how b&w made it all about the geometry!

The great geometry in this image definitely gives it a lot of impact. Converting it to b&w was a great way to get rid of the distractions so we could focus on the shapes.

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